whenever i read a poem or hear a song with ‘he’ or ‘his’ or ‘him’ as the subject/narrator/protagonist, i replace it with her/she/hers and feel way way better about it

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alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.
High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.
But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

i feel like the rise and fall and rise again of skinny jeans (on and off since 1950’s motorcycle tough-guy culture) has been a sort of revival for the admiration of men’s leg musculature in fashion

alliartist:

rifa:

prokopetz:

nebcondist1:

prokopetz:

I’ve seen this image going around, and I feel compelled to point out that it’s only half-right. It’s true that high heels were originally a masculine fashion, but they weren’t originally worn by butchers - nor for any other utilitarian purpose, for that matter.

High heels were worn by men for exactly the same reason they’re worn by women today: to display one’s legs to best effect. Until quite recently, shapely, well-toned calves and thighs were regarded as an absolute prerequisite for male attractiveness. That’s why you see so many paintings of famous men framed to show off their legs - like this one of George Washington displaying his fantastic calves:

… or this one of Louis XIV of France rocking a fabulous pair of red platform heels (check out those thighs!):

… or even this one of Charles I of England showing off his high-heeled riding boots - note, again, the visual emphasis on his well-formed calves:

In summary: were high heels originally worn by men? Yes. Were they worn to keep blood off their feet? No at all - they were worn for the same reason they’re worn today: to look fabulous.

so then how did they become a solo feminine item of attire?

A variety of reasons. In France, for example, high heels fell out out of favour in the court of Napoleon due to their association with aristocratic decadence, while in England, the more conservative fashions of the Victorian era regarded it as indecent for a man to openly display his calves.

But then, fashions come and go. The real question is why heels never came back into fashion for men - and that can be laid squarely at the feet of institutionalised homophobia. Essentially, heels for men were never revived because, by the early 20th Century, sexually provocative attire for men had come to be associated with homosexuality; the resulting moral panic ushered in an era of drab, blocky, fully concealing menswear in which a well-turned calf simply had no place - a setback from which men’s fashion has yet to fully recover.

FASHION HISTORY IS HUMAN HISTORY OK

Thank you, history side of tumblr. That “stay out of blood” thing has been driving me mad.

i feel like the rise and fall and rise again of skinny jeans (on and off since 1950’s motorcycle tough-guy culture) has been a sort of revival for the admiration of men’s leg musculature in fashion

(via shinier-happier-people)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 154,905 notes. .
This was posted 1 week ago. It has 0 notes. .
me

me

(Source: wordsandturds, via shinier-happier-people)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 152,835 notes. .

insertfandomreference:

wow what the actual fuck neopets

(Source: dudewithabow, via sixpenceee)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 168,252 notes.

(Source: linabirdbeauty, via shinier-happier-people)

This was posted 1 week ago. It has 7,206 notes. .
ppaction:

NOPE. 

more like re-fuckstick-licans

ppaction:

NOPE. 

more like re-fuckstick-licans

(via sapphiremallory)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 28,477 notes. .
I maintain that every civil rights bill in this country was passed for white people, not for black people. For example, I am black. I know that. I also know that while I am black I am a human being. Therefore I have the right to go into any public place. White people don’t know that. Every time I tried to go into a public place they stopped me. So some boys had to write a bill to tell that white man, “He’s a human being; don’t stop him." That bill was for the white man, not for me. I knew I could vote all the time and that it wasn’t a privilege but my right. Every time I tried I was shot, killed or jailed, beaten or economically deprived. So somebody had to write a bill to tell white people, “When a black man comes to vote, don’t bother him." That bill was for white people. I know I can live anyplace I want to live. It is white people across this country who are incapable of allowing me to live where I want. You need a civil rights bill, not me.

Stokely Carmichael, setting shit straight and placing responsibility for the “race problem” squarely where it belongs. 

 

The very language in regards to civil rights in this country is embedded in white supremacist ideology. How many of us have been duped into accepting the fallacious notion that whites have “given” blacks rights? The notion itself presupposes black inferiority while failing to acknowledge the root problem: white racism. Change the language, change your mind.

(via chancellorschamber)

OMG

(via weakdaes)

Pair with “Racism is the white people’s disease”. Ya’ll brought on the problems.

(via kenobi-wan-obi)

(via milfgrl)

This was posted 2 weeks ago. It has 21,144 notes.
Tips For Being An Unarmed Black Teen
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